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Sheryl Gowen

Emeritus    Principal Investigator, Evaluation of Georgia PREP    
Education

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Philosophy, Queens College, 1968
Master of Arts in Education, Goucher College, 1969
Doctor of Philosophy in Curriculum and Instruction, Georgia State University, 1990
Certificate in Program Evaluation, George Washington, 2013

Specializations

Program Evaluation
Mixed Methods Designs
Ethnographic Research
Case Study Research
Adult Literacy

Biography

Sheryl Gowen works for the Department of Educational Policy Studies.

Publications

PUBLICATIONS
Refereed Scholarly Journal Articles:
*Gowen, S. & Waller, A. (2002). Gender equity in engineering: A review of educational research and public policy in the United States since 1964. Published Proceedings of the 2002 American Society of Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition. Women in Engineering Division. Washington, DC: American Society of Engineering Education.
*Gowen, S. (1991). Beliefs about adult literacy: Measuring women into silence/Hearing women into speech. Discourse and Society.
*Deming, M. & Gowen, S. (1990). Gender influences on the writing processes of college basic writers. Community/Junior College Research and Practice Quarterly.
*Singer, M. & Gowen, S. (1989). Enhancing cultural schema. Notes on Teaching English, XVI (2), 16-17.
Books and Monographs
*Gowen, S. (1992). The Politics of Workplace Literacy: A Case Study. New York: Columbia University, Teachers College Press.
Technical Reports
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., & Alemdar, M. (2007). Evaluation of the Georgia Academic Learn & Serve Program, Year Three Final Report. Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, Georgia.
Sheryl Gowen
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Gowen, S., Fournillier, J., Skelton, Cochran-Jackson, E. Stubbs, T. & Cutts, Q. (2006). Evaluation toolkit: The Georgia Department of Human Resources Youth Development Initiative. Georgia Department of Human Resources. 44 pages.
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., Skelton, S. Krug, B. & Lingle, J. (2006). Evaluation toolkit: The Georgia 21st Community Learning Centers Program. Georgia Department of Education. 33 pages.
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., Skelton, S. Krug, B. & Lingle, J. (2005). Evaluation of Georgia’s 21st Community Learning Centers Program and Implementation of a Web-based Data Management System: Phase II Quarterly Report. Georgia Department of Education. 44 pages.
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., Skelton, S. Krug, B. & Lingle, J. (2005). Evaluation of Georgia’s 21st Community Learning Centers Program and Implementation of a Web-based Data Management System: Phase I Summative Report. Georgia Department of Education. 133 pages.
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., Skelton, S. Krug, B. & Lingle, J. (2005). Evaluation toolkit: The Georgia 21st Community Learning Centers Program. Georgia Department of Education. 54 pages.
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., Livingston, S. & Alemdar, M. (2005). Evaluation of the Georgia Academic Learn & Serve Program, Year Two Final Report. Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, Georgia.
Gowen, S. Livingston, S. & Alemdar, M. (2005). The Evaluation Toolkit, 2nd ed. Georgia Department of Education. Atlanta, Georgia.
Gowen, S., Furlow, C., Livingston, S. & Alemdar, M. (2004). Evaluation of the Georgia Academic Learn & Serve Program, Year One Final Report. Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, Georgia.
Gowen, S. (2004). The Evaluation Toolkit. Georgia Department of Education. Atlanta, Georgia.
Gowen, S., Livingston, S. & Alemdar, M. (2004). Evaluation of the Georgia Academic Learn & Serve Program, Year 1 Final Report. Georgia Department of Education, Atlanta, Georgia.
Gowen, S. (1994). “I’m no fool”: Reconsidering American workers and their literacies, in Peter O’Conner (Ed.), Thinking Work. Sydney, Australia: ALBSAC.
Gowen, S. (1990). Literacy for the nineties: Discovering empowerment or instructing basic skills? Center for the Study of Adult Literacy, Georgia State University: Atlanta, GA
Gowen, S. (1992). In celebration of ourselves. Twelve Pages, 2(1), 1-6.
Hiles, J. & Gowen, S.G. (1992). “Atlanta Works Project: A Review of the Literature.” Atlanta, GA: Center for the Study of Adult Literacy, Georgia State University.
Greenwood, A. (pseudonym) (Winter, 1991). A look at a workplace literacy program. Voices. Photographs and essays of employees in a workplace literacy program.
Deming, M. & Gowen, S. (June 1990). “Can we get there from here? Intersections of race, gender and class in teaching basic writing.” ERIC Document Service. Ed 322 523.
Gowen, S. (1989). The right to literacy. Text Quarterly, I (2), 1-2.
Gleaton, T. & Gowen, S. (1984). The chronic young offender. Psychiatry Newsletter
Articles, Essays, and Chapters in Books
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Gowen, S. (1997). Friends in the kitchen: Gendered work as a site for collaborative literacy instruction, in G. Hull, (Ed.), Changing work, Changing workers: Critical perspectives on language, literacy, and skills. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.
Gowen, S. (1997). This is a School. We want to go to school. In Jean-Paul Hautecoeur, (Ed.), ALPHA 97: Basic Education and Institutional Environments. Quebec: UNESCO Institute for Education.
Gowen, S. (1996). How the reorganization of work destroys everyday knowledge. In Jean-Paul Hautecoeur, (Ed.), Alpha 96: Basic Education and Work. Toronto: Culture Concepts, Inc. & UNESCO Institute for Education. pp. 11-32.
French translation: Comment la reorganization du travail détruit le savoir faire ordinare. Jean-Paul Hautecoeur, Editor. Alpha 96: Formation de Base et Travail. Quebec: Institut de l’UNESCO Pour l’education. pp. 13 – 38.
Gowen, S. (1994). The “Literacy Myth” at work: The role of print literacy in school-to-work transitions, in R. D. Lakes (Ed.) Critical Education for Work: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
Reviews of Scholarly Work of Others
Gowen, S. (January, 2005). The educational welcome of Latinos to the New South. The Journal of Latinos and Education, (4)1. pp. 71-74.
Gowen, S. (2002). Sociocultural Perspectives on Learning through Work: New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education #92. Tara Fenwick (Editor) Adult Basic Education. (12) 2.