Group shot of award recipients holding their awards

CEHD announces 2017 Faculty Award recipients

Photo caption: (l-r) Franco Dispenza, Jackie Lund, Christine Thomas, Nicole Patton Terry, Paul Alberto, Julie Washington, Joyce King and Gholnecsar Muhammad pose at the end of the Faculty Awards Luncheon on March 29. Not pictured: Kristen Buras and Christopher Tullis.  

The College of Education & Human Development is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2017 Faculty Awards.

These faculty have published extensively, mentored hundreds of educators, secured significant grant funding, and represented Georgia State University and the College of Education and Human Development in school systems, community organizations and in their disciplines.

The 2017 recipients are:

Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award for Graduate Teaching
Kristen Buras, associate professor, Department of Educational Policy Studies
This award recognizes a full-time faculty member in the college for outstanding achievement in the area of teaching.

Kristen Buras has spent the past decade researching school reform in New Orleans, including charter schools and alternative teacher recruitment. She is the co-founder and director of Urban South Grassroots Research Collective for Public Education (USGRC) and was granted the Distinguished Scholar- Activist Award by Critical Educators for Social Justice of AERA. She is past associate editor for the Journal of Education Policy and a current fellow of the National Education Policy Center.

Outstanding Faculty Service to the Profession Award
Jackie Lund, professor, Department of Kinesiology and Health
Christine Thomas, professor, Department of Middle and Secondary Education
This award recognizes full-time faculty members who fulfill in an exemplary way the college’s commitment to service and has consistently demonstrated exemplary service to their profession at a national level.

Jackie Lund draws on her 16 years of public school teaching experience while working as a teacher educator. She has been involved with the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) throughout her career in higher education, beginning with the committee that developed the National Content Standards for Physical Education (1995). She also served as president, assessment series editor, a NASPE/NCATE adjudicator and a NASPE PIPEline clinician. In 2013, she was inducted into the NASPE Hall of Fame.

Her areas of interest include assessment (measuring dispositions in teacher candidates), curriculum development and teacher effectiveness.

Christine Thomas served as past president of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE), she strived to further solidify AMTE as the premier organization promoting the improvement of mathematics teacher education through the dissemination of high-quality educational research and innovative models for teacher preparation and professional development, and through ongoing advocacy for high quality mathematics teaching.

She is also an active member of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, where she served on the board of directors (2008-2011) and as a member of the editorial panel of the journal Mathematics Teacher (2007-2011).

Outstanding Faculty Service to the Community Award
Joyce King, Benjamin E. Mays Endowed Chair for Urban Teaching, Learning and Leadership, Department of Educational Policy Studies
This award recognizes a full-time faculty member who fulfills in an exemplary way the college’s commitment to service and has consistently demonstrated exemplary service to the community and/or campus.

Joyce King is a former provost and professor of education at Spelman College and associate provost at Medgar Evers College. She is widely recognized for her contributions to the field of education, including the concepts of “dysconscious racism,” “diaspora literacy” and “heritage knowledge.” She has published seven books, including “The Afrocentric Praxis of Teaching for Freedom: Connecting Culture to Learning,” “Preparing Teachers for Cultural Diversity,” “Teaching Diverse Populations: Formulating a Knowledge Base,” “Black Mothers to Sons: Juxtaposing African American Literature with Social Practice,” and “Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century.”

Outstanding Faculty Research Award
Franco Dispenza, assistant professor, Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
This award recognizes a full-time faculty member in the college for outstanding achievement in the area of scholarship.

Franco Dispenza’s scholarship, grant work and clinical specialization is in the area of multiculturalism, career development and practitioner training. He specifically focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) persons, persons living with disabilities (PWD), and the intersection of these identities. In particular, he focuses on three particular aspects with these populations: (1) the psychosocial experiences of Chronic Illness and Disability (CID); (2) career/vocational development; and (3) rehabilitation/mental health practitioner training, education and supervision.

Outstanding Urban Education Research Award
Gholnecsar Muhammad, assistant professor, Department of Middle and Secondary Education
Julie Washington, professor, Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
This $500 award, funded by Dr. Ron Colarusso, Dean Emeritus of the college, recognizes a tenured or tenure-track faculty member for outstanding achievement in the areas of scholarship and creative activity in urban education.

Gholnecsar Muhammad serves as director of Georgia State University’s Urban Literacy Collaborative and Clinic. Her research interests are situated in the social and historical foundations of literacy development among African Americans and writing representations among African-American adolescent girls. She explores 19th century African American literary societies to understand historical literacy practices and how this cultural history can advance practices with youth today. Her research is also situated in locating intersections of Black girls’ histories, identities and literacies.

Julie Washington is an affiliate faculty of the Research on the Challenges of Acquiring Language and Literacy initiative and the Urban Child Study Center at Georgia State University. Her work focuses on understanding cultural dialect use in African-American children with a specific emphasis on the impact of dialect on language assessment, literacy attainment and academic performance. Her work with preschoolers has focused on understanding and improving the emergent language skills necessary to support later reading proficiency in high-risk groups, with a special focus on the needs of children growing up in poverty in urban contexts.

Amy R. Lederberg Award for Outstanding Research in Educational Psychology

Christopher Tullis, assistant professor, Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
This honor, which includes a $1,000 award, recognizes research contributions to the field of educational psychology.

Christopher Tullis is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral (BCBA-D) and his research interests include teaching people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) problem solving skills, behavioral assessment of people with ASD, and teaching daily living and vocational skills using video-prompting and video modeling. He was formerly an assistant professor of applied behavior analysis at Ball State University and has published in several journals, including the Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities, Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, Psychology in the Schools, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities and Education and Treatment in Autism and Developmental Disabilities.

College of Education & Human Development Distinguished Faculty Award

Nicole Patton Terry, associate professor, Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
This $1,000 award recognizes a full-time faculty member in the college for outstanding contributions to their discipline through a combination of research and service.

Nicole Patton Terry is the executive director of the Urban Child Study Center and is a member of the university’s Board of Regents Initiative on Research on the Challenges of Acquiring Language and Literacy. She is also an associate editor for the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, a research scientist at Haskins Laboratories at Yale University, and a board member for the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading. Her research interests concern young children with and without disabilities who struggle to acquire language and literacy skills, in particular children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and children living in poverty.

College of Education & Human Development Faculty Awards are given annually and are by nomination. This year’s recipients will be recognized at a luncheon held in their honor on March 29.