Giving – CEHD http://education.gsu.edu College of Education & Human Development Fri, 15 Dec 2017 16:23:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://aeadmin1.gsu.edu/?v=4.6.1 College of Education & Human Development Giving – CEHD College of Education & Human Development Giving – CEHD http://education.gsu.edu/wp-content/plugins/powerpress/rss_default.jpg http://education.gsu.edu/category/giving/ School’s Never Out for Priscilla Oliver http://education.gsu.edu/news-and-events/schools-never-out-for-priscilla-oliver/ Tue, 18 Aug 2015 20:21:34 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=27861 Priscilla Oliver earned her doctorate degree in educational administration and credits Georgia State for helping her kick off a rewarding career that’s lasted four decades.

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Priscilla Oliver stands in front of a colorful mural in Atlanta

School’s Never Out for Priscilla Oliver

Written by Georgia State University’s Office of Donor Relations

On a beautiful spring afternoon in downtown Atlanta, as students stroll through Woodruff Park thinking about how they’ll soon be done with college, Priscilla Oliver is talking about how she loved studying so much that she chose to go back for additional degrees.

“I didn’t know it at the time,” Oliver says of her early career as a fish and wildlife biologist, “but I’m not totally happy unless I’m at a school.”

Today Oliver is a life scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), but she still spends plenty of time at schools — in downtown Atlanta, across the state of Georgia, and beyond. In addition to conducting site visits for the National Environmental Health and Protection Accreditation Council, which accredits environmental health programs, she also mentors aspiring medical students and spreads the gospel of environmental health in the hopes of bringing a new generation of health scientists and physicians into the field.

Oliver, who earned master’s and doctorate degrees from Georgia State, gives the school credit for introducing her to that field — and for kicking off a rewarding career that’s lasted four decades and counting. “I tell students, ‘Find something you’re passionate about so that it doesn’t feel like work.’ Before you know it, you’ve got 30, 40 years in, and it still doesn’t feel like work.”

How ‘Something Easy’ Became Something Special

Of course, Oliver admits that she wasn’t always passionate about environmental health, at least not as an undergraduate student at the University of Alabama. “When I was in college, I took a two-hour ecology class. You know how you’re looking for electives, something easy? ‘Two hours, oh, yeah, I’ll take that,’” she remembers, shaking her head and smiling.

The ecology class wasn’t exactly a breeze, but it did pique her interest. After graduating from Alabama, she spent a few years in Baltimore with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers doing environmental impact studies on wetland construction projects, then worked as a fish and wildlife biologist in Brunswick, Ga.

Still, Oliver had a feeling she wasn’t done with school just yet. And in 1978, when she saw an advertisement for an EPA position in Atlanta — right down the street from a wide variety of educational opportunities — she jumped at the chance. She had wanted to live in Atlanta since coming here for the first time while a senior in high school, and says her mother and grandfather and mother told her plenty of stories about the city and relatives who lived there.

Priscilla Oliver stands in front of the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Site

Oliver earned her doctorate degree in educational administration and credits Georgia State for helping her kick off a rewarding career that’s lasted four decades.

When Oliver first got to Atlanta, Georgia State was a much smaller place — “I think the school had about four buildings then,” she remembers — but it still had excellent professors. “Many of them gave me so much wisdom. The late Dr. Roland Knobel and Dr. Richard Barbe were excellent role models who served on my dissertation committee. Georgia State taught me so much about everything — I probably would’ve never gotten to know so much if I hadn’t come here.”

Sometimes knowledge came from an unexpected place, like the medical anthropology class with Charles Bitley her dissertation committee professors urged her to take. “I thought, ‘Why should I take a medical anthropology class, I’m getting ready to graduate!’” Oliver says. “But we’d go around the world looking at different health practices, how medicine works in other countries, how people view illness, how they get well. We had Vietnamese tribal healers come to class, studied Balinese healers, Eskimo medicine men . . . All of this was fun, and I came to realize why they wanted me to take that class. You know, professors are pretty smart.”

After three years of night classes, “I got the Master of Public Administration degree, got out of school, and within a year I was bored. So I turned around and went back to school,” she says, and laughs. “I was a busy person that year — working full time, taking classes, doing a residency working on the Dream Jamboree college fair with the late Jean Childs Young and Atlanta city schools, and renovating a house. But I don’t regret going to Georgia State one bit. It’s a highlight of my life here in Atlanta.”

A Mover and a Shaker, in Atlanta and Beyond

Nearly 30 years have passed since Oliver earned her doctorate degree in educational administration, but she hasn’t strayed too far from the Georgia State campus. “I love sitting in my office and looking out at Georgia State, Grady Memorial Hospital, and Turner Field — it kind of makes my day,” she says.

While her location may not have changed, Oliver hardly sounds like someone who’s settled into a routine. She has seen the scope and significance of environmental health grow steadily over the years, to the point where it now encompasses everything from restaurant health inspections to partnering with FEMA and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on disaster response. “When there’s a [Hurricane] Katrina or some kind of disaster, we may be called on to make sure the water’s clean and that the land is safe,” she explains. “We deal with the quality of the air you breathe, the quality of the water you drink, the quality of the food you eat, and the quality of the land where you live. So it’s important to have all people involved, because all persons are affected.”

Oliver has also jumped at the chance to take on responsibilities beyond her office walls. A 20-year member of the National Environmental Health Association, Oliver makes frequent visits to colleges and universities to increase students’ awareness of her field’s importance — and of the many job opportunities they’ll find once they graduate. She also stays involved with her own community through Ebenezer Baptist Church and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., which honored her with a Torch Award earlier this year.

And, of course, she devotes plenty of time to school — as a teacher rather than a student. Clark Atlanta University’s Department of Public Administration honored Oliver with the Trailblazer Award for her work with students and educational programs, and she received the Anthony M. Rachal Award of Excellence from speaking and mentoring at Xavier University of Louisiana.

Oliver also maintains a faculty appointment as a professor at the Morehouse School of Medicine, where she helped start the Master of Public Health Program and wrote several grants to increase personnel and infrastructure at the school. In 1995, after being sought out by numerous Morehouse pre-med students looking to make connections with established physicians, Oliver also founded the Physician and Undergraduate Student Educational Partnerships (PAUSE) Foundation Inc.

“It’s like a mini-medical school for pre-meds,” she explains. “They get greater exposure to the science of medicine, participate in clinical assignments, shadow various doctors — pediatricians, OB-GYNs, internal medicine, family physicians, dentists, you name it.”

Still Devoted to Students

Oliver is also a life member of the Georgia State University Alumni Association, and her alma mater remains high on the list of institutions where she loves to share her time and resources. Ever since she earned her Ph.D., Oliver has been a loyal supporter of programs such as the Panther Athletic Club and Office of Black Student Achievement. As a first-generation student herself, she says she’s proud of the “powerhouse” role Georgia State has taken in reaching out to students typically underserved by the higher education system.

“I believe in supporting organizations that help people,” she says, “especially less fortunate, lower-income, underprivileged and diverse people.”

Oliver also sees Georgia State’s ongoing consolidation with Georgia Perimeter College as a golden opportunity both for students and for the field in which she works. “Many junior-college students don’t know what they want to do because they haven’t had the exposure that four-year college students get,” she explains. “We need to tell them what public health and medicine are all about.”

Who knows, maybe one of them will even have Priscilla Oliver as a lecturer. Even when she mentions retirement, she talks about it as an opportunity to spend more time in school, and expresses gratitude for the opportunity to serve.

“When I retire, I would like to teach,” she says. “One reason why I started teaching early in my career is so I could be prepared for retirement. It doesn’t feel like work to me — it’s like going to have fun every day.”

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Ways to Give http://education.gsu.edu/giving-alumni/giving/ways-to-give/ Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:30:48 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=23908 Start supporting the College of Education & Human Development today with your online gift.

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Give Online Now

Make a gift right now! 

 

A named endowment provides a stable stream of funding to support students, faculty, lectures or programs.

Create an endowment 

For more information contact our Office of Development

Many of our alumni and friends choose to support the college through gifts of stocks or securities.

Give a gift of stocks or securities 

You can often double or even triple your gift with matching funds provided by your employer. Check with your company’s human resources department to learn whether your company offers a gift matching option.

Create a matching gift 

Georgia State is a leading public research university, and it's only possible thanks to the generosity of alumni and friends like you. Through a planned gift, which offers broadened opportunities to make a difference, you can support the College of Education and Human Development’s mission today. You don't have to be a certain age or extremely wealthy. You just need a plan, and you've come to the right place.

Learn about gift planning 

The Dean’s Society is a special group of alumni and friends who support the College of Education & Human Development.

Get more information about the Dean’s Society or to join. 

Ready to get started today? Have more questions? Contact a gift officer today.

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Office of Development http://education.gsu.edu/giving-alumni/giving/office-of-development/ Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:17:08 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=23931 Please contact:

McRae Stephenson JD Director of Development Contact – 404-413-8132 mcraestephenson@gsu.edu

Jessica Jamison Assistant to the Development Director jjamison4@gsu.edu

Mailing Address:

College of Education & Human Development P.O. Box 3980 Atlanta, GA 30302-3980

In Person:

30 Pryor Street SW Suite 1018 Atlanta, GA 30303

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Please contact:

McRae Stephenson JD
Director of Development
Contact – 404-413-8132
mcraestephenson@gsu.edu

Jessica Jamison
Assistant to the Development Director
jjamison4@gsu.edu

Mailing Address:

College of Education & Human Development
P.O. Box 3980
Atlanta, GA 30302-3980

In Person:

30 Pryor Street SW
Suite 1018
Atlanta, GA 30303

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Dean’s Society http://education.gsu.edu/giving-alumni/giving/deans-society/ Fri, 31 Jul 2015 16:10:31 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=23911 The Dean’s Society is a special group of alumni and friends who support the College of Education & Human Development. Find out how you can join.

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Greetings!

Interim Dean Paul A. Alberto

Paul A. Alberto

I am delighted that you are considering becoming a member of the College of Education & Human Development’s Dean’s Society!

The Dean’s Society is a special group of alumni and friends who support the College of Education & Human Development (CEHD) by contributing $500.00 or more during the fiscal year to any CEHD fund. The Dean’s Society is instrumental in supporting the College as it offers competitive scholarships, recruits esteemed faculty, and provides innovative teaching and research programs that promote education in our communities.

Benefits of membership include:

  • Invitation to the annual Dean’s Society Reception;
  • Annual recognition in the College’s magazine;
  • Invitation to attend the biannual Dean’s Society Breakfast & Conversation with the Dean;
  • A subscription to our publications Research & Innovations and IN: the College of Education & Human Development; and
  • Tours of select College of Education & Human Development research facilities.

For more information or to join, please contact the Office of Development. I am sincerely grateful for your dedication to the College of Education & Human Development and the Dean’s Society, and I look forward to our ongoing partnership as we continue to Move Lives Forward.

Sincerely,

Deal Paul Alberto's signature

Paul A. Alberto, Ph.D.
Dean and Regents’ Professor
College of Education & Human Development

Dean's Society logo banner

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Advancement Council and Campaign Committee http://education.gsu.edu/giving-alumni/giving/advancement-council-and-campaign-committee/ Fri, 31 Jul 2015 15:44:28 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=23906 The Advancement Council is a select group of alumni and friends of the college who work together to support the college’s mission.

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The College of Education & Human Development’s Advancement Council and Campaign Committee is a select group of alumni and friends who contribute their time, expertise, and resources to advance the College’s Mission and support the College’s participation in GSU’s $300 million Burning Bright Campaign. These members advocate for specific college programs; advise the Dean concerning campaign activities; assist in the identification, cultivation and solicitation of donors; host events and receptions; and do so much more.

If you are interested in learning more about the College of Education & Human Development’s Advancement Council and Campaign Committee or GSU’s Burning Bright Campaign, please contact McRae Stephenson at mcraestephenson@gsu.edu or 404-413-8132.

Laura Abbott
Clinical Instructor
Kinesiology and Health

Beverly J. Armento, Ed.D.
Professor Emerita

Ann W. Cramer
Senior Consultant
Coxe Curry & Associates

Deborah P. Crockett, B.A. ’78; M.Ed. ’82; Ed.S. ’83; Ph.D. ‘87
Past President
National Association of School Psychologists

Vicki M. Denmark, Ph.D ‘95
Vice President – Education Innovation
AdvancED

Susan Eckert, Ph.D. ‘95
Former Senior Associate Dean Emeritus
Emory University

Patricia P. Ferrer, B.A. ’71; M.Ed.’75

Gayle Gellerstedt, M.Ed. ‘92

F. Stuart Gulley, Ph.D. ‘99
President
Woodward Academy

Lucille W. Hayden, M.Ed. ’77; Ph.D. ‘86
Former Associate Executive Director
SACS

Sandra C. Hofmann, B.S. ‘74
CIO in Residence
Advanced Technology Development Center

Craig Hoover. M.S. ‘95
VP – National Alliances
LiveNation

Vesta O. Jones, M.Ed. ‘73
Counselor

Cynthia J. Kuhlman, M.Ed. ’74; Ph.D. ‘80
Director of Educational Achievement
CF Foundation, Inc.

Felicia M. Mayfield, B.S. ’75; Ed.S. ’87; M.Ed. ‘80
Director of Field Services & Partnerships
Clark Atlanta University

Al McWilliams, Jr., Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Educational Policy Studies
Georgia State University

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For Frank Brandon, Life is a Walk in the (Forest) Park http://education.gsu.edu/frankbrandon/ Mon, 03 Nov 2014 19:27:41 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/frankbrandon/ Every 35 seconds (on average), a plane takes off from or lands at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport — and quite a few of them pass over the suburb of Forest Park as they do so. The whine of jet engines provides steady background noise as Georgia State alumnus Frank Brandon goes about his daily work.

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Every 35 seconds (on average), a plane takes off from or lands at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport — and quite a few of them pass over the suburb of Forest Park as they do so. The whine of jet engines provides steady background noise as Georgia State alumnus Frank Brandon goes about his daily work.

“You never really get used to it, but I’ve lived here 42 years. I live three blocks from City Hall,” Brandon says. “I guess I’m as used to it as I can be.”

Fortunately, Brandon fell in love with Forest Park long before he became its city manager last year. He describes the city as being “one of the loves of my life” — with his alma mater being another. But Georgia State is more than just the place where Brandon earned three degrees and two professional certifications: It’s a place he credits as having helped him develop from an “immature, wild” teenager into a leader.

‘Georgia State Means the World to Me’

Brandon doesn’t mince any words as he describes the “awful young man” he was before he got to Georgia State in 1965. “I was terrible!” he says, shaking his head. “I think if it weren’t for Georgia State University and my wife, I would’ve probably been a failure. But Georgia State helped me to mature — it gave me leadership skills, taught me ethics. And I’ve been grateful ever since.”

In particular, he credits professors Sanford Bederman and the late Joseph Baylen as having “helped me grow up and mature as a man, and told me, ‘Frank, never give up.’” Brandon even remembers the “a-ha moment” in one of Bederman’s classes that taught him the value of hard work and commitment.

“I was taking the intro to geography class, and I made a D on the first major test, and he only gave maybe three tests,” Brandon recalls. “I was going to drop the course, so I went to talk to him, and he said, ‘Frank, you never, never, never give up’ — Winston Churchill said that. He said, ‘Stick with this, persevere, and I guarantee you can still can get an A out of this course if you work at it.’ His little talk really inspired me, because he had this caring attitude about his students — you know how some professors are. I stuck with it, and I didn’t get an A, but I did get a B-plus.

“That just always stuck with me. As I taught college and ran schools and things like that, I always told people, ‘Give it 100 percent, you can get through any brick wall you have to — any brick wall. You just have to focus in on what’s important.’”

Having found a sense of direction, Brandon helped found a Georgia State chapter of the Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity in 1968 with fellow Panthers Tony Burger and Tommy Barber, all of whom remain active in the organization. Not only that, he went on to earn a master’s degree in history and an education specialist degree in the social sciences — and, later, both master’s and educational specialist certifications in administration and leadership. Since then he’s shown his gratitude to Georgia State not only through his financial support, especially to the GSU Athletics Association, but also through his time, serving for several years on the alumni association’s board of directors.

“Georgia State means the world to me,” Brandon says. “It did so much for me in terms of leadership skills, learning how to do the right thing, and knowing that everything you undertake, you have to give 100 percent.”

From Student to Teacher, Principal and Leader

After he graduated from Georgia State, Brandon taught at Atlanta’s Murphy High School (today the Alonzo A. Crim Open Campus High School) for eight years and then transferred to Forest Park High. At the time, the move south was mainly for financial reasons — “We found a good deal, I’m not gonna mislead you on that,” he says with a grin — as President Gerald Ford had just signed the Earned Income Tax Credit into law. Over the course of a four-decade career as an educator and administrator, though, he and his wife Jackie (a Georgia State graduate herself) came to love their new hometown.

“I’m 67 years old, and here I am trying to run a relatively large city at my age when I should be basking in the sun,” he says, smiling. “But I love what I do. And I love these people.”

Brandon served as assistant principal of Jonesboro High School, directed the creation of the Clayton County Alternative School, and was a professor at Clayton State University up until last August. That was when fellow Georgia State alum David Lockhart, who’d recently been elected mayor, offered him the position of city manager. In Forest Park, that title carries plenty of day-to-day responsibility. Brandon is in charge of hiring and firing city employees, researching issues that are of concern to the mayor and city council, and drafting the plans and policies they can vote to implement or not — all the while trying to keep as many of Forest Park’s 19,000 residents happy as possible.

“We’re a truly multicultural city — we have about 27 percent white, about 34 percent black, about 34 percent Hispanic or Latino, and 5 percent Asian,” he says. ”So to try to make everyone happy with their different cultural aspirations, that can be a challenge in and of itself. You’ve got to show your residents respect and dignity, and try to solve the problems that they have, whether it’s lack of garbage pickup at times, dogs out in the street, any of those little things. They may seem minor, but they are challenges, because if you don’t solve them you’re going to end up hearing about it at a council meeting. Just like Georgia State tries to be customer-friendly to its students, you’ve got to provide customer service to your residents.”

Fortunately, Brandon says he’s blessed with a city that’s “definitely on the right track.” He and Forest Park scored a major coup this past summer when Kroger announced it would build a one-million-square foot distribution center on some of the land formerly occupied by Fort Gillem — adding 150 new jobs right away and the potential for many more in the near future. With Forest Park’s proximity to all manner of transportation hubs, Brandon is optimistic that growth will continue.

“Fort Gillem is right near the airport and right off I-675, which means you can be at the Port of Savannah in three hours,” he explains. “That’s going to be the largest port on the East Coast in 10 years. Kroger looked at that, and other companies are looking at that too. All types of positive things are happening.”

In Brandon’s office at City Hall, municipal ledgers and development plans for the Fort Gillem site share space with an eclectic collection of memorabilia — a football signed by Herschel Walker here, the knife Arnold Schwarzenegger carried in “Predator” there, the daggers that Orlando Bloom carried as Legolas in the “Lord of the Rings” films mounted on the wall. Brandon is an unabashed fan of fantasy and sci-fi, which made it all the more exciting when the producers of the TV series “The Walking Dead” scouted Forest Park as a filming location last year.

Unfortunately, the show ended up saying no. It was those darn airplanes.

“They came here and thought about filming at Fort Gillem, but they decided they couldn’t because of the airplane noise — those planes fly right over Gillem, and they were afraid they couldn’t screen it out properly.” Even now, a look of disappointment creeps across Brandon’s face, but then he shrugs and smiles. “I got all their autographs, though.”

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A Boost for Tomorrow’s Teachers: Kay Chester http://education.gsu.edu/kaychester/ Fri, 15 Aug 2014 13:00:44 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/kaychester/ Kay Chester has heli-skied in Canada, raised horses, flown a jet and helped manage a family-owned empire of Harley-Davidson dealerships that stretches from Fort Lauderdale to the Grand Tetons.

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Kay Chester has heli-skied in Canada, raised horses, flown a jet and helped manage a family-owned empire of Harley-Davidson dealerships that stretches from Fort Lauderdale to the Grand Tetons. Yet there’s a part of her that’s always been wistful for a chapter in her life that she never got to fully pursue: teaching.

“I would’ve liked to have tried my hand at it,” says Chester, who earned a bachelor’s degree and a teaching certification from Georgia State in 1969 but started raising a family before she could begin a career in education. “I think it would’ve been interesting to have a class that I really interacted with and got to know.”

Not that Chester, who’s spent the last 25 years enjoying the breathtaking scenery and outdoor activities of Vail, Colo., has many regrets about her life. But she does remember the challenges she faced working her way through school while starting a family — and she says she’d like to make life a little easier for future College of Education & Human Development students in similar situations. That’s why she recently endowed the Kay Chester Scholarship for Teachers in Training.

She’s Come a Long Way — but Hasn’t Forgotten Where She Started

Chester, who grew up in an “airline family” in College Park (“The area where we lived is now a runway, I think,” she says with a chuckle), started college in the summer quarter of 1965 and got married that August. Her husband attended classes at Georgia Tech while she went to what was then called Georgia State College, and they both worked their way through school — her first taste of the challenges a “working couple” could face.

“I was determined to finish my education, and I did, but I worked a number of jobs. I was your Southern Bell information operator, back in the days we were plugging in the cords. I would work at department stores — whatever, whenever, wherever the job came up and whatever season it was, I would be there. We were on the quarter system then, and quarterly admissions cost something like $250. Today, that’s nothing, but back then it was a lot.”

Reflecting on those hectic days as a working student, Chester decided to endow a scholarship with a specific sense of purpose. If all other selection criteria for the Kay Chester Scholarship are equal, preference will be given to a female College of Education & Human Development student who is raising a family while pursuing her degree.

“When I got divorced just recently, at age 65, I thought through my life and I remembered that period of my life where money had been sketchy,” she explains. “And I thought, ‘If I can help some working woman who’s trying to go to school while she’s working and she has a family, that’s what I’m going to do.’ This is my first step into that.”

The endowment has particular meaning at Georgia State, Chester adds, because of the accommodations that the university provided for female students like her who were having the “non-traditional” college experience. “I was obviously not sorority material,” she laughs, “but there was a group called MRS [Mu Rho Sigma], a sorority that developed for married women, and most of us were working, of course. We had a room that we could go to, and I understand it’s no longer there, but it was a place that we could collect ourselves, we could visit with each other, we could share experiences, and that was a very important part of my college experience. Partying was out for me since I was working, but this was a little getaway, and it was fabulous. I wish they still had it.”

A Life Filled With Blessings

With a major in English and a minor in Spanish, Chester earned her degree in 1969. Just a short time later, she found out she was pregnant with her first child — at a time when it was rare for expecting mothers to be hired for any kind of job, teaching included.

Even with her teaching career sidelined, though, Chester found fulfillment in other ways. One was by helping her husband build a series of businesses around the country; another was by hitting the slopes.

“Our first trip to Vail was in ’67,” she says. “We had learned to ski at Maggie Valley, N.C., and we’d tried Sugarbush and Beech Mountain, so we thought, ‘OK, let’s try the West.’ Well, we fell in love with it. So skiing is what brought us here — the lifestyle, the security, the friends, everything.”

The Chesters bought a vacation home in Vail in 1980 and moved out to Colorado full-time eight years later, around the time her oldest son, Craig, graduated from high school. Both Craig and her younger son, Cliff, earned degrees from the University of Colorado, helped run the family businesses and eventually bought houses in Vail themselves. “I have this wonderful circle of friends here,” Kay says, “and now my family’s here. Both boys have homes here — one is part time and one is full time. And I’m just so blessed that they’re here with me.”

These days you’re more likely to find Kay Chester sporting jodhpurs and riding boots than skis. “I’ve been into horses for a number of years, Paint Horses in particular, so that’s my passion right now,” she says. “I’m learning dressage and I have a couple of hunter-jumpers, so we have a good time with that.

“I have girlfriends who are involved with that too, and I have a great group support here. It’s amazing. People think that in a resort community, you don’t have everything that you need, but you know what? If you’ve lived here and it’s your home, it’s truly amazing how special it is. And we have a special environment, temperatures, beautiful scenery, and special people that make it great.”

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News and Events http://education.gsu.edu/news-and-events/ Fri, 27 Sep 2013 17:31:31 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=2082 College News Events Faculty and Staff News Student News In Education Magazine Stories Read the current issue

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College News

Events

Faculty and Staff News

Student News

In Education Magazine Stories Read the current issue

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Giving http://education.gsu.edu/giving-alumni/giving/ Fri, 16 Aug 2013 20:52:06 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=932 News from around the College of Education & Human Development View the news archive »

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Capital Campaign

Invest with the College of Education & Human Development and help our students, faculty and programs.
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Ways to Give

Start supporting the College of Education & Human Development today with your online gift.
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Advancement Council and Campaign Committee

A select group of alumni and friends of the college who work together to support the college’s mission.
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Dean's Society

A group of alumni and friends who support the College of Education & Human Development.
Find out how you can join.
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Planned Giving

When you include a gift to Georgia State University in your overall estate plan, you open up a world of opportunity for future Georgia State students, giving them the tools they need to achieve great things.
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Endowments & Naming Opportunities

Many individuals choose to give an enduring gift to Georgia State by creating an endowed fund.
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Contact Us

Ask us about the college, our future, and how our donors are helping it take shape.
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Alumni Network

A commitment to leadership in education and dedicated to advancing social and professional opportunities for its members.

News from around the College of Education & Human Development View the news archive »

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Giving & Alumni http://education.gsu.edu/giving-alumni/ Fri, 16 Aug 2013 20:51:49 +0000 http://education.gsu.edu/?page_id=930 Keep making a difference after you graduate.

The College of Education & Human Development is training the next generation of educators. You can continue your support by giving to the college and joining the Alumni Network. Your gift enhances the college in every area, and our Alumni Network is dedicated to advancing social and professional… more »

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Keep making a difference after you graduate.

The College of Education & Human Development is training the next generation of educators. You can continue your support by giving to the college and joining the Alumni Network. Your gift enhances the college in every area, and our Alumni Network is dedicated to advancing social and professional opportunities for our members.

 

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