Sep
4
Fri
2015
Fulbright U.S. Student Program deadline
Sep 4 all-day

College of Education and Human Development graduate students and recent alumni interested in studying and teaching abroad can apply for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program through Sept. 4, 2015.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program offers grants for individually-designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. Grant recipients live, work and learn from people in the host country, giving all involved a more global perspective and a better understanding of each other’s cultures.

According to Fulbright’s website, the following people can apply for grants:

  • Recent graduates. Graduating seniors and recent bachelor’s-degree recipients who have some undergraduate preparation and/or direct work or internship experience related to the project.
  • Master’s and doctoral candidates. Graduate-level candidates must demonstrate the capacity for independent study or research, together with a general knowledge of the history, culture and current events of the countries to which they are applying.
  • Young professionals, including writers, creative and performing artists, journalists, and those in law, business, and other professional fields. Competitive candidates who have up to five years of professional study and/or experience in the field in which they are applying will be considered. Those with more than five years of experience should apply to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars in the Fulbright Scholar Program.

For more information about applying for the program, contact Katrina Helz at khelz@gsu.edu or visit GSU Fulbright Program Advisers or us.fulbrightonline.org.

Sep
9
Wed
2015
Prospectus Presentation – Laura Rosenbaum @ College of Education and Human Development, room 981
Sep 9 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Enhancing executive function in preschoolers through a mindfulness-based intervention
by Laura Rosenbaum

Executive functioning includes skills such as maintaining attention, inhibiting attention towards distractions, and making decisions based on incoming information. These skills develop across the lifespan with the most dramatic growth occurring during the preschool years (i.e. ages 3-5; (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University [CDCHU], 2011 ). The development of executive functioning in the preschool years is important as these skills form the foundation for school readiness and future academic achievement, above and beyond intellectual ability (Fitzpatrick et al., 2014). One suggested approach to enhancing executive functioning in preschoolers is through mindfulness-based interventions (MBis). Mindfulness refers to paying attention to the internal and external experiences of the present moment with acceptance and curiosity. Among other positive outcomes, researchers who have explored MBis with school-aged children have reported significant improvements in executive functioning. Although we know that the preschool years are a time of dramatic growth for EF skills and that MBis can improve EF skills in older children, research on the effectiveness of MBis with young children is limited. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate Mini Mind, an MBI developed specifically for preschool-aged children. The intervention includes twelve 20-minute sessions across 6 weeks and focuses on developing curiosity towards and awareness of internal and external experiences. We propose to use a randomized, wait-list active control design with 40 preschool students. We plan to use multiple sources and methods of evaluation to provide a comprehensive understanding of the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of Mini Mind.

Sexual Misconduct Policy Session @ College of Education and Human Development, room 1030
Sep 9 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Georgia State University is committed to providing a safe learning environment that supports the dignity of all members of the University community. The University will not tolerate sexual misconduct and will take necessary steps to end reported sexual misconduct.

To learn more about these policies we are offering two sessions for faculty, staff, and graduate teaching.

  • September 9, 2015 from 10– 11:30 a.m. in room 1030 (the Forum)
  • September 17, 2015 from 1:30–3 p.m. in room 1030 (the Forum)

Upon completion of this educational session you will be able to:

  • Define sexual misconduct, which includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking
  • Understand the federal laws and Georgia State University policies related to sexual misconduct
  • Identify inappropriate behaviors of a sexual nature
  • Understand an employee’s responsibility in responding to sexual misconduct

This session is facilitated by members of the Office of Opportunity Development-AA/EEO Training and Compliance, Office of the Dean of Students, and the Office of Student Health Promotions.

Professional Development Wednesdays @ College of Education and Human Development, room 1030
Sep 9 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Office of Research and Sponsored Projects Presentation

This presentation will begin at 12 p.m. in the Forum (College of Education and Human Development, room 1030).

Sep
11
Fri
2015
STEAM3 Conference @ Georgia State University's Centennial Hall
Sep 11 @ 9:00 am – 5:30 pm

Georgia State University will bring emerging technologies and the newest teaching and learning models to Atlanta at its STEAM3 Conference (science, technology, engineering, arts and math “cubed”) on Sept. 11-12, 2015.

The conference, hosted by the university’s College of Education and Human Development and the nonprofit Learning Innovations in Future Education, will transform the first floor of Georgia State’s Centennial Hall into an interactive learning environment, complete with immersive labs, workshops and demonstration areas focused on four themes: “The Living Classroom,” “The Game of Learning,” “Make Magic” and “Interactive Storytelling.”

Attendees will not only be able to experience the latest technologies and interactive methods for teaching STEAM subjects, but also listen to panel discussions and presentations by learning technology experts from Georgia State, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Robots and Pencils, Nano Art 21, the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation and Training and other innovative organizations.

The conference will also feature an interactive playground that highlights topics like the gamification of learning and digital storytelling.

Those interested in attending can purchase two-day conference passes or one-day passes for the interactive playground by visiting http://steam3.com/purchase-tickets. For information about group rates, contact Maggie Duval at mduval@futures-lab.com.

For a listing of presenters and exhibitors, visit http://steam3.com.

Volunteer to be part of STEAM3.

Program Information Session for Counseling and Psychological Services @ College of Education & Human Development Room 915
Sep 11 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for our program information session for the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services. We hold these sessions on-campus in the College of Education & Human Development and detail each program and their admissions requirements for prospective students within our department.

To learn more about the programs this department offers, view our Academics & Admissions page.

Register for this event 
Sep
12
Sat
2015
STEAM3 Conference @ Georgia State University's Centennial Hall
Sep 12 @ 9:00 am – 5:30 pm

Georgia State University will bring emerging technologies and the newest teaching and learning models to Atlanta at its STEAM3 Conference (science, technology, engineering, arts and math “cubed”) on Sept. 11-12, 2015.

The conference, hosted by the university’s College of Education and Human Development and the nonprofit Learning Innovations in Future Education, will transform the first floor of Georgia State’s Centennial Hall into an interactive learning environment, complete with immersive labs, workshops and demonstration areas focused on four themes: “The Living Classroom,” “The Game of Learning,” “Make Magic” and “Interactive Storytelling.”

Attendees will not only be able to experience the latest technologies and interactive methods for teaching STEAM subjects, but also listen to panel discussions and presentations by learning technology experts from Georgia State, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Robots and Pencils, Nano Art 21, the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation and Training and other innovative organizations.

The conference will also feature an interactive playground that highlights topics like the gamification of learning and digital storytelling.

Those interested in attending can purchase two-day conference passes or one-day passes for the interactive playground by visiting http://steam3.com/purchase-tickets. For information about group rates, contact Maggie Duval at mduval@futures-lab.com.

For a listing of presenters and exhibitors, visit http://steam3.com.

Volunteer to be part of STEAM3.

Sep
16
Wed
2015
Dissertation Defense – Yi-Shi Hsiao @ College of Education and Human Development, room 981
Sep 16 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

“Perfectionism, Acculturative Stress, Coping Styles, and Depression among International Students”
by Yi-Shi Hsiao

The present study examined whether adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism, acculturative stress, and three coping strategies (reflective, suppressive, and reactive) have interaction effects in predicting depression. Data were collected from 789 international students at seventeen different college campuses across the United States using an online survey. Results from hierarchical regression analyses indicated that there were significant main effects for adaptive perfectionism, maladaptive perfectionism, acculturative stress, and three coping strategies. Results also indicated that there were four significant two-way interactions among the variables in the prediction of depression. Ineffective coping (suppressive and reactive) moderated the relationship between acculturative stress and depression. Maladaptive perfectionism moderated the relationship between acculturative stress and depression. Reflective coping moderated the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and depression only for students with relatively higher maladaptive perfectionism. There were no significant three-way interactions among the variables in the prediction of depression. Implications for counseling and future research suggestions are discussed.

Professional Development Wednesdays @ College of Education and Human Development, room 1025
Sep 16 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Business Managers Presentation

Presenter: Matt Gillett

This presentation will begin at 12 p.m. in College of Education and Human Development room 1025.

To Cite or Not to Cite: Understanding Your Role in Academic Dishonesty @ College of Education and Human Development, room 1030
Sep 16 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm