May
4
Mon
2015
Dissertation Defense – Millicent Carmouche @ College of Education, room 830
May 4 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Effects of Virtual Teacher Coaching with Videoconferencing on the Increase of Teacher Given Opportunities to Respond and the On-Task Behavior of Students with Emotional Behavior Disorders
by Millicent Carmouche

Teachers of students with emotional/behavior disorders (E/BD) are expected to manage classroom behavior using evidence-based practices such as Opportunities to Respond (OTR), which is a teacher behavior that petitions a student response and has been shown to have positive effects on student academic achievement and on-task behavior when consistently implemented by classroom teachers (Haydon, Conroy, Scott, Sindelar, Barber, & Orlando, 2010; West & Sloan, 1986). Evidence-based practices are most often introduced during traditional professional development (PO) workshops, which may or may not otter follow up to ensure continued and proper implementation. Virtual coaching is a means of offering expert feedback to a teacher to improve his/her classroom practice via on-line technologies (Israel, Carnahan. Snyder. & Williamson, 2012). Virtual coaching with Videoconlerencing can take place using Internet programs like Skype, Google Hangouts, OoVoo, or Face Time. This practice is cost-effective and allows for flexibility in scheduling for the teacher and coach.

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect a virtual teacher coaching with videoconferencing intervention has on the frequency with which teachers offer OTR to middle school age students with E/80. A single-case multiple baseline design will be used to measure teacher behavior before and after the intervention is introduced. After baseline data are collected, the researcher will conduct virtual coaching sessions to increase OTR after every other observed session. The second aim of this study is to examine what effect OTR has on on-task behaviors or middle-school age students with EIBD. Students will be observed in the classroom during baseline and after the intervention to increase OTR is introduced.

May
5
Tue
2015
Prospectus Presentation – Pamela T. Hughes @ College of Education, room 608
May 5 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The Relationship of Mathematics Anxiety, Mathematical Beliefs, and Instructional Practices of Elementary School Teachers
by Pamela T. Hughes

Since the early 1960s, mathematics education researchers have considered the affective domain as an important aspect of teaching and learning mathematics (Mcleod, 1992). The affective domain is comprised of emotions, attitudes, beliefs, opinions, interests, motivation, and values (Goldin, 2002). In the past few decades, researchers have begun to focus on the affective characteristics of mathematics teachers (see, e.g., Mcleod, Austin, Wadlington, & Bitner, 1992; Mcleod, 1992; Philipp, 2007; Raymond, 1997). It is suggested that the affective characteristics may be the missing variable that links teachers’ instructional practices to students’ learning (Ernest, 1989). In addition to teachers’ cognitive characteristics directly influencing student learning, it is also suggested that teachers’ characteristics influence how they teach, which, in tum, influences student learning (Hart, 2002). Two affective variables strongly related to teachers’ instructional practices are mathematics anxiety and mathematical beliefs (see, e.g., Beilock, Guderson, Ramirez, & Levine, 2010; Bush, 1989; Jackson & Leffingwell, 1999; Kelly & Tomhave, 1985). The purpose of this proposed quantitative survey study, therefore, is to explore the relationships among mathematics anxiety, beliefs about the nature of mathematics and teaching, and instructional practices of practicing elementary teachers (n = 300) as they relate to the mathematics reform efforts promoted by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (see, e.g., 1989, 1991, 1995, 2000, 2014). The study will be grounded, theoretically, in Ernest’s social constructivism as a philosophy of mathematics and mathematics teaching and learning (1998) and in his model of relating teachers’ content knowledge. attitudes, instructional beliefs, and instructional practice (1989). The instruments administered during data collection will include the Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale: Short Version (Suinn & Winston, 2003), the Teacher Beliefs Survey (Beswick, 2005), and the Teachers’ Practices Survey (2006). Data analysis will consist of descriptive methods as well as correlational analyses.

Prospectus Presentation – Sara Klco @ College of Education, room 981
May 5 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Healing PTSD with mindfulness: The role  of avoidance as a mechanism of action
by Sara Klco

Trauma has the capacity to produce a wide range of symptoms that have a damaging impact on psychological, biological, and social functioning (van der Kolk & McFarlane, 1996). Though several widely used empirically-supported treatments for trauma exist, the literature has identified several concerns with some treatments (e.g. Prolonged Exposure), including increased suicidality, panic attacks, and alcoholic relapse (Pitman et al., 1991 ), high nonresponse rates, and high dropout rates (Jefferys et al., 2013). Others have observed that cognitive-behavioral interventions are frequently effective in reducing specific PTSD symptoms, but often do not address other common reactions to trauma such as emotion dysregulation, interpersonal problems, borderline personality disorder, existential impacts, and complex PTSD (Follette et al. , 2015). Therefore, there is a need for modified, addtional , or adjunctive treatments for trauma symptoms. Mindfulness is emerging as one such treatment, and has a growing base of empirical support. The existing research on mindfulness and trauma is reviewed, and a case example is presented to illustrate the application of mindfulness-based trauma treatment. The current study will examine one potential mechanism behind mindfulness’ efficacy in treating trauma-experiential avoidance. The study hyothesizes that for survivors of trauma, experiential avoidance will partially mediate the relationship between mindfulness and trauma symptoms. The hypothesis will be tested using regression-based mediation analyses. The hope of this project is that by conducting and reviewing mindfulness-based research, clinicians can learn to apply these techniques in safe, ethical, and effective ways, leading their clients towards health, empowerment, and resiliency.

Prospectus Presentation – Sara Klco @ College of Education, room 896
May 5 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Healing PTSD with mindfulness: The role of avoidance as a mechanism of action
by Sara Klco

Trauma has the capacity to produce a wide range of symptoms that have a damaging impact on psychological, biological, and social functioning (van der Kolk & McFarlane, 1996). Though several widely used empirically-supported treatments for trauma exist, the literature has identified several concerns with some treatments (e.g. Prolonged Exposure), including increased suicidality, panic attacks, and alcoholic relapse (Pitman et al., 1991 ), high nonresponse rates, and high dropout rates (Jefferys et al., 2013). Others have observed that cognitive-behavioral interventions are frequently effective in reducing specific PTSD symptoms, but often do not address other common reactions to trauma such as emotion dysregulation, interpersonal problems, borderline personality disorder, existential impacts, and complex PTSD (Follette et al., 2015). Therefore, there is a need for modified, additional, or adjunctive treatments for trauma symptoms. Mindfulness is emerging as one such treatment, and has a growing base of empirical support. The existing research on mindfulness and trauma is reviewed, and a case example is presented to illustrate the application of mindfulness-based trauma treatment. The current study will examine one potential mechanism behind mindfulness’ efficacy in treating trauma-experiential avoidance. The study hyothesizes that for survivors of trauma. experiential avoidance will partially mediate the relationship between mindfulness and trauma symptoms. The hypothesis will be tested using regression-based mediation analyses. The hope of this project is that by conducting and reviewing mindfulness-based research, clinicians can learn to apply these techniques in safe, ethical, and effective ways, leading their clients towards health, empowerment, and resiliency.

 

 

Dissertation Defense – Christi L. Pace @ College of Education, room 256
May 5 @ 11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Re-imagining Professional Development: A Study of Teacher Educators’ Integration of a Web Seminar Series as a Component of University-Based Teacher Education
by Christi L. Pace

Internet platforms such as Blackboard Collaborate, Desire2Learn, and Moodie. have revolutionized how educators communicate by creating collaborative opportunities once limited only to the face-to-face settings (King, 2001; LaJoie, Garcia, Berdugo, Marquex, Espindola & Nakamura, 2006). Using computer mediated communication tools, teachers can now participate in quality, ongoing, collaborative, and situated learning. While an abundance of research exists pertaining to teacher professional development, little is known about the use of a web seminar format as a venue for online teacher professional development. Even less is known about teacher educators’ integration of a professional development web seminar as a component of the courses they teach. The purpose of this qualitative study, then, was to understand teacher educators’ use of an open access web seminar whose goal is to disseminate cutting-edge literacy research and improve literacy practices (Global Conversations in Literacy Research) within their language and literacy teacher education courses. This qualitative study sought to answer the following: (a) Why do literacy teacher educators use online professional development web seminars within their courses? (b) How do literacy teacher educators use online professional development web seminars within their courses, especially those presented by Global Conversations in Literacy Research? and (c)What value do literacy teacher educators see in working with the web seminars in their classes, especially those presented by GCLR? This study was ground in critical situated learning, which includes theories of critical literacy (Janks, 2000), situated learning (Brown, Collins, & Duguid, 1989), collaborative learning (Borko, 2004; Brown et. al., 1989; Lave & Wenger, 1991), and legitimate peripheral participation (Brown et. al., 1989). Within an interview study design, the constant comparative method (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Merriam, 2009) was used to analyze data collected from semi-structured interviews and teacher educators’ course syllabi documents.

The Language & Literacy Initiative’s Distinguished Lecture featuring Dr. Esther Dromi
May 5 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

The Language & Literacy Initiative’s Distinguished Lecture on Tuesday, May 5, 2015 will feature Dr. Esther Dromi of Tel Aviv University.

What: Language & Literacy Distinguished Lecture Series
When: Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 1:00 pm
Where:

Get more information:

Prospectus Presentation – Stacey McElroy @ College of Education, room 1025
May 5 @ 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

A Review of Humility Measures and a Test of the Social Bonds Hypothesis
by Stacey McElroy

Less than 10 years ago, the science of humility seemed stuck with intractable measurement problems. However, due to theoretical innovations, measures have proliferated in recent years. In order to avoid fragmentation, humility science faces a critical stage of needing to reconcile and integrate definitions and measures. In Chapter 1, I review 15 measures of humility, including (a) survey measures of general humility, (b) survey measures of humility subdomains, and (c) indirect measures of humility. For each measure, I describe the scale structure, development of items, evidence of reliability, and evidence of construct validity. I also describe and compare the various content areas covered by each measure, and conclude by making recommendations for advancing research on humility. Then in Chapter 2, I will use a multi-method strategy for measuring humility which includes self-report, informant reports, and behavioral coding. This will serve to empirically address the hypothesis described in the literature that self-reports of humility are biased due to modesty effects or social desirability. I will also test the social bonds hypothesis of humility by empirically testing a moderation model of cultural humility in intercultural couples. Specifically, I predict that cultural humility will buffer the effects of culturally-based conflict on relationship satisfaction, trust, and commitment.

May
9
Sat
2015
College of Education Spring Convocation @ Georgia World Congress Center
May 9 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am

The College of Education Spring Convocation Ceremony is scheduled for Saturday, May 9, 2015, at 9 a.m. in the Thomas Murphy Ballroom in the Georgia World Congress Center.

This convocation is for all spring undergraduate, master’s, educational specialist and Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) candidates. All College of Education Ph.D. candidates will participate in a separate hooding ceremony.

For more information about the ceremony, please visit http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/student-recognition/coe-convocation.

May
12
Tue
2015
Dissertation Defense – Jearl Nix @ College of Education, room 630
May 12 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Looking at the Past: Eighth Grade Social Studies Teachers and Historical Visual Texts
by Jearl Nix

Teachers in the 21st century are faced with students who are mass consumers of visual texts via social apps on smart devices, media on television, and information in textbooks. Teaching students to analyze and question visual texts may help them construct meaning and critique what they see. Yet, very little is known about teachers’ pedagogical decisions when planning and teaching with visual texts. This study attempted to fill that gap. The purpose of this study was to explore how eighth grade history teachers utilize historical visual texts in their classrooms. Three eighth grade history teachers participated in this study.

Data collection consisted of semi-structured interviews, teacher analyses of visual texts, video recorded lessons, teacher reflections, and analysis for historical thinking and visual literacy components. Data obtained in this study addressed the following questions: How do teachers analyze a historical visual text for use in the classroom? What previous experiences do teachers utilize when planning to teach with a historical visual text? What do teachers’ reflections of a video recorded lesson reveal about the teachers’ instructional experiences with historical visual texts? What do video analyses of teachers utilizing historical visual texts reveal about teachers’ historical thinking and visual literacy pedagogical decisions?

The results of this study indicated that the participants lack formal learning and prior experiences in teaching with historical visual texts. Yet, the participants reported that their lessons in this study were engaging and meaningful for students. Findings from this study suggest that historical visual texts can be effective in the teaching and learning of history.

May
14
Thu
2015
Prospectus Presentation – Jennifer Pinkett Smith @ College of Education, room 481
May 14 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Bullying in Middle Schools: A Case Study Investigating School Personnel’s Perception of Bullying
by Jennifer Pinkett Smith

Repeated instances of bullying plague our schools and immobilize the learning environment for many students. Dissimilar views of policies related to bullying make it difficult for school personnel to intervene on the victim’s behalf. The purpose of this study is to identify the perceptions that school personnel have about bullying and intervention policies and procedures associated with bullying in their schools. The proposed qualitative case study will examine how policies and practices, as set by school leaders of two private middle schools in the metro Atlanta area impact school personnel’s efforts to intervene in bullying.

The research questions to be addressed are: What are school personnel’s perceptions of policies and procedures as they relate to bullying and how school personnel’s perception of bullying impacts their efforts to intervene? Participants for the study will include middle school principals, counselors and teachers. Data will be collected through interviews, a research journal, and artifacts which include: document and content analysis. Implications for future research may include school-wide policy evaluation and implementation of professional development aimed at bullying intervention. Additionally, schools may consider instituting anti-bullying programs that promote awareness of bullying.