Sep
4
Fri
2015
Fulbright U.S. Student Program deadline
Sep 4 all-day

College of Education and Human Development graduate students and recent alumni interested in studying and teaching abroad can apply for the Fulbright U.S. Student Program through Sept. 4, 2015.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program offers grants for individually-designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs. Grant recipients live, work and learn from people in the host country, giving all involved a more global perspective and a better understanding of each other’s cultures.

According to Fulbright’s website, the following people can apply for grants:

  • Recent graduates. Graduating seniors and recent bachelor’s-degree recipients who have some undergraduate preparation and/or direct work or internship experience related to the project.
  • Master’s and doctoral candidates. Graduate-level candidates must demonstrate the capacity for independent study or research, together with a general knowledge of the history, culture and current events of the countries to which they are applying.
  • Young professionals, including writers, creative and performing artists, journalists, and those in law, business, and other professional fields. Competitive candidates who have up to five years of professional study and/or experience in the field in which they are applying will be considered. Those with more than five years of experience should apply to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars in the Fulbright Scholar Program.

For more information about applying for the program, contact Katrina Helz at khelz@gsu.edu or visit GSU Fulbright Program Advisers or us.fulbrightonline.org.

Sep
8
Tue
2015
CEHD 2015-2016 Global Initiative Grant Deadline
Sep 8 all-day

The College of Education and Human Development’s Office of International Programs has limited funding available for faculty involved in international projects. Proposals for the 2015-2016 CEHD Global Initiative Grant will be accepted through Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015.

Full-time CEHD faculty engaged in international research actives are encouraged to submit a proposal. For more information, click here.

Sep
9
Wed
2015
Prospectus Presentation – Laura Rosenbaum @ College of Education and Human Development, room 981
Sep 9 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Enhancing executive function in preschoolers through a mindfulness-based intervention
by Laura Rosenbaum

Executive functioning includes skills such as maintaining attention, inhibiting attention towards distractions, and making decisions based on incoming information. These skills develop across the lifespan with the most dramatic growth occurring during the preschool years (i.e. ages 3-5; (Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University [CDCHU], 2011 ). The development of executive functioning in the preschool years is important as these skills form the foundation for school readiness and future academic achievement, above and beyond intellectual ability (Fitzpatrick et al., 2014). One suggested approach to enhancing executive functioning in preschoolers is through mindfulness-based interventions (MBis). Mindfulness refers to paying attention to the internal and external experiences of the present moment with acceptance and curiosity. Among other positive outcomes, researchers who have explored MBis with school-aged children have reported significant improvements in executive functioning. Although we know that the preschool years are a time of dramatic growth for EF skills and that MBis can improve EF skills in older children, research on the effectiveness of MBis with young children is limited. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate Mini Mind, an MBI developed specifically for preschool-aged children. The intervention includes twelve 20-minute sessions across 6 weeks and focuses on developing curiosity towards and awareness of internal and external experiences. We propose to use a randomized, wait-list active control design with 40 preschool students. We plan to use multiple sources and methods of evaluation to provide a comprehensive understanding of the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of Mini Mind.

Sexual Misconduct Policy Session @ College of Education and Human Development, room 1030
Sep 9 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Georgia State University is committed to providing a safe learning environment that supports the dignity of all members of the University community. The University will not tolerate sexual misconduct and will take necessary steps to end reported sexual misconduct.

To learn more about these policies we are offering two sessions for faculty, staff, and graduate teaching.

  • September 9, 2015 from 10– 11:30 a.m. in room 1030 (the Forum)
  • September 17, 2015 from 1:30–3 p.m. in room 1030 (the Forum)

Upon completion of this educational session you will be able to:

  • Define sexual misconduct, which includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking
  • Understand the federal laws and Georgia State University policies related to sexual misconduct
  • Identify inappropriate behaviors of a sexual nature
  • Understand an employee’s responsibility in responding to sexual misconduct

This session is facilitated by members of the Office of Opportunity Development-AA/EEO Training and Compliance, Office of the Dean of Students, and the Office of Student Health Promotions.

Professional Development Wednesdays @ College of Education and Human Development, room 1030
Sep 9 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Office of Research and Sponsored Projects Presentation

This presentation will begin at 12 p.m. in the Forum (College of Education and Human Development, room 1030).

Sep
10
Thu
2015
Language & Literacy Distinguished Lecture Series with Dr. Melanie Schuele @ Urban Life Building
Sep 10 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Dr. Melanie Schuele, Vanderbilt University

The Language & Literacy Initiative’s Distinguished Lecture on Thursday, September 10, 2015 in the Room 1199, on the 11th floor of the Urban Life Building at 10:00 am.  A reception will follow the presentation by Dr. Melanie Schuele from Vanderbilt University “Complex Syntax in Children with Specific Language Impairment: The Perils and Rewards of Wading into Uncharted Territory.”

Sep
11
Fri
2015
STEAM3 Conference @ Georgia State University's Centennial Hall
Sep 11 @ 9:00 am – 5:30 pm

Georgia State University will bring emerging technologies and the newest teaching and learning models to Atlanta at its STEAM3 Conference (science, technology, engineering, arts and math “cubed”) on Sept. 11-12, 2015.

The conference, hosted by the university’s College of Education and Human Development and the nonprofit Learning Innovations in Future Education, will transform the first floor of Georgia State’s Centennial Hall into an interactive learning environment, complete with immersive labs, workshops and demonstration areas focused on four themes: “The Living Classroom,” “The Game of Learning,” “Make Magic” and “Interactive Storytelling.”

Attendees will not only be able to experience the latest technologies and interactive methods for teaching STEAM subjects, but also listen to panel discussions and presentations by learning technology experts from Georgia State, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Robots and Pencils, Nano Art 21, the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation and Training and other innovative organizations.

The conference will also feature an interactive playground that highlights topics like the gamification of learning and digital storytelling.

Those interested in attending can purchase two-day conference passes or one-day passes for the interactive playground by visiting http://steam3.com/purchase-tickets. For information about group rates, contact Maggie Duval at mduval@futures-lab.com.

For a listing of presenters and exhibitors, visit http://steam3.com.

Volunteer to be part of STEAM3.

Program Information Session for Counseling and Psychological Services @ College of Education & Human Development Room 915
Sep 11 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

Join us for our program information session for the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services. We hold these sessions on-campus in the College of Education & Human Development and detail each program and their admissions requirements for prospective students within our department.

To learn more about the programs this department offers, view our Academics & Admissions page.

Register for this event 
Sep
12
Sat
2015
STEAM3 Conference @ Georgia State University's Centennial Hall
Sep 12 @ 9:00 am – 5:30 pm

Georgia State University will bring emerging technologies and the newest teaching and learning models to Atlanta at its STEAM3 Conference (science, technology, engineering, arts and math “cubed”) on Sept. 11-12, 2015.

The conference, hosted by the university’s College of Education and Human Development and the nonprofit Learning Innovations in Future Education, will transform the first floor of Georgia State’s Centennial Hall into an interactive learning environment, complete with immersive labs, workshops and demonstration areas focused on four themes: “The Living Classroom,” “The Game of Learning,” “Make Magic” and “Interactive Storytelling.”

Attendees will not only be able to experience the latest technologies and interactive methods for teaching STEAM subjects, but also listen to panel discussions and presentations by learning technology experts from Georgia State, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Robots and Pencils, Nano Art 21, the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation and Training and other innovative organizations.

The conference will also feature an interactive playground that highlights topics like the gamification of learning and digital storytelling.

Those interested in attending can purchase two-day conference passes or one-day passes for the interactive playground by visiting http://steam3.com/purchase-tickets. For information about group rates, contact Maggie Duval at mduval@futures-lab.com.

For a listing of presenters and exhibitors, visit http://steam3.com.

Volunteer to be part of STEAM3.

Sep
14
Mon
2015
Prospectus Presentation – Kan Guvensel @ College of Education and Human Development, room 915
Sep 14 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

The relationship among Gender Role Conflict Normative Male Alexithymia men’s non-romantic relationships, and the psychological well-being of men
by Kan Guvensel

The impact of masculinity on men’s relationships and well-being has received much empirical and theoretical attention by researchers over the past 30 years. Normative Male Alexithymia (NMA; Levant 1992) and Gender Role Conflict (GRC; O’Neil, 2008) have emerged in the literature as empirically supported masculinity-based constructs that could be possible predictors of men’s psychological well-being. The majority of existing studies examined the impact of masculinity in the contexts of men’s romantic relationships. Yet, there exists a paucity of research that examines the triadic intersection of the GRC, NMA, and men’s friendships; and the relationship among these three variables with the psychological well-being of men. The purpose of this study is to examine the triadic relationship of GRC, NMA, and men’s friendships with other men, and the impact of this triadic relationship on men’s psychological well-being. The study will answer the following three research questions: (1) What are the relationships among men’s tolal scores regarding Gender Role Connie! (GCR), Normative Male Alexithymia (NMA), men’s same-sex friendship conflicts, and psychological well-being? (2) Does GRC significantly moderate the effect of NMA and same sex relationship qualities/connicts on men’s psychological well-being? (3) Which model most accurately predicts the relationship between GRS, NMA, men’s same-sex friendships conflicts, and psychological well-being in college men? Data collection will include survey responses from the demographic questionnaires, Normative Male Alexithymia Scale (NMAS; Levant et al., 2006) scores, Gender Role Conflict Scale (GRCS; O’Neil et al, 1986) scores, Network of Relationships Questionnaire Relationship Qualities Version (NRI-RQV; Buhrmester, 1992; Buhrmester & Furman, 2008) scores, and the Scales of Psychological Well-Being (SPWB; Ryff, 1989) scores. Bivariate correlation analyses will be conducted to test the relationships among all of the variables. A hierarchical regression analysis with two separate interaction variables will be conducted to test the moderation. The interaction variables will consist of the product of the scores of NRI-RQV and GRCS, and the product of the scores of NMAS and GRCS. Finally, the all possible regression analysis (Pedhazur, 1997) will be conducted to determine the best predictive model.