Jul
6
Wed
2016
Dissertation Defense – Sara Klco @ CEHD, Room 923
Jul 6 @ 8:00 am – 10:00 am

“Healing PTSD with Mindfulness: Exploring the Mechanism of Change”

by:  Sara Klco

Trauma has the capacity to produce a wide range of symptoms that have a damaging impact on psychological, biological, and social functioning (van der Kolk & McFarlane, 1996; Briere & Scott, 2013). Though several empirically-supported treatments for trauma exist and are used widely, the literature has Identified concerns with some of the leading treatments, such as increased suicidality, panic attacks, alcoholic relapse (Pitman, et al., 1991), high nonresponse rates, and high dropout rates (Jeffreys, et al., 2013). Others have observed that cognitive-behavioral interventions, while often effective in decreasing specific PTSD symptoms, often do not address other common reactions to trauma such as emotion dysregulation, interpersonal problems, Borderline Personality Disorder, existential impacts of trauma, and complex PTSD (Follette et al., 2015). It is therefore our ethical duty as researchers and clinicians to explore additional, modified, or adjunctive treatments for trauma symptoms. Mindfulness is emerging as one such possibility, and has a growing base of empirical and theoretical support (Kimbrough et al., 2010; Smith, 2011; Kearney et al., 2012, 2013; Follette et al., 2006; Steil et al., 2011; Lang et al., 2012). Though there is considerable support showing that mindfulness is effective in treating trauma, gaps in the research literature exist that examine how and why mindfulness is effective (Coffey & Hartman, 2008). The current study examined one potential mechanism behind mindfulness’s efficacy in treating trauma symptoms, experiential avoidance. The study’s hypothesis is that for survivors of trauma, experiential avoidance will mediate the relationship between mindfulness and trauma symptoms. The hypothesis was tested via regression-based mediation analysis with bootstrapping. The results revealed a significant indirect effect of mindfulness on trauma symptoms via experiential avoidance. Results also indicated a significant direct effect of mindfulness on trauma symptoms. This confirms the hypothesis that mindfulness is indeed effective in decreasing trauma symptoms, and that one of the ways in which mindfulness works may be via decreasing experiential avoidance. The hope of this project is that by conducting mindfulness-based research clinicians can learn to apply these techniques in ethical, and effective ways, leading their clients towards health, empowerment, and resiliency.

Dissertation Defense – Jennifer A. Smith @ CEHD, Room 926
Jul 6 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

“Gender Nonconformity in Youth and Safety: Utilizing Photo-Elicitation and Thematic Analysis”

by:  Jennifer A. Smith

Social stigma against gender diverse people continues to exist (Rieger & Savin-Willimas, 2012), and this extends to gender nonconforming youth (D’augelli, Grossman, & Starks, 2006). Expression and exploration of fluid gender identity and gender roles are part of typical human development (Institute of Medicine, 2011). Childhood gender nonconformity is defined as variation from norms in gender role behavior (Adelson & The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 2012). Recommendations for research with gender nonconforming youth include gaining a clearer understanding of safe relationships, which is currently lacking in the literature (Institute of Medicine, 2011). Safety occurs when an individual takes psychological and interpersonal risks without fearing negative consequences (Edmondson, 1999). This study explored safety among gender nonconforming youth through the theoretical perspective of constructivism (Lincoln, Lynham, & Guba, 2011) and queer theory (Plummer, 2011), and utilized the qualitative methods of photo-elicitation (Harper, 2002) and thematic analysis (Boyatiz, 1998). Participants (n=8) identified nine themes as integral to safe relationships among gender nonconforming youth; six of which provide understanding for establishing and maintaining safe relationships and three that identify threats to establishing and maintaining safe relationships. These include components of safe relationships, safety negotiation, gender as a fluid process, respecting autonomy, advocacy, resilience, harmful relationships, minority stress, and oppression. Implications for counseling practitioners, counselor educators, and future research are discussed.

Prospectus Presentation – Claudine Odette Anderson @ CEHD, Room 923
Jul 6 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

“Community Violence and Trauma: The Influence of Child Abuse, Bullying and Intimate Partner Violence”

by:  Claudine Odette Anderson

Community violence exposure is a pervasive public health issue in the United States that has been linked to a range of negative psychological and adjustment outcomes (Rosenthal & Wilson, 2003; Scarpa, 2001; Scarpa & Ollendick, 2003). Although there is a robust body of literature connecting community violence exposure and posttraumatic stress symptoms, exposure has also been linked with other types of violent victimizations. The research on how exposure in community settings affects psychological functioning within the context of other potentially traumatic experiences is still developing (Finkelhor, Vanderminden, Turner, Shattuck & Hamby, 2016; Kelly, Schwartz, Gorman & Nakamoto, 2008). This proposed research will investigate the interrelationships between community violence, school bullying, intimate partner violence, child abuse and PTSD with a sample of 500 undergraduate students. The study will also examine how intimate partner, child abuse and bully victimization moderate the relationship between community violence and PTSD. Simultaneous multiple linear regression and hierarchical multiple regression analyses will be used to determine the combined relationships between community violence, child abuse, school bullying and intimate partner violence on PTSD symptoms and verify whether child abuse, intimate partner violence and school bullying moderate the relationship between community violence and PTSD. Treatment and policy implications, limitations, and directions for future research will be discussed.

Jul
12
Tue
2016
Prospectus Presentation – Mary Spencer Cain @ Suite 137, Large Conference Room
Jul 12 @ 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

“A Randomized Control Trial Investigating the Effects of a 4-week Ankle Rehabilitation Program on High School Athletes with Chronic Ankle Instability”

by:  Mary Spencer Cain

BACKGROUND: Various rehabilitation exercises have been used to reduce residual symptoms and decreased function that are associated with Chronic Ankle Instability (CAl). Research has shown that resistance band and BAPS board programs are effective; however, utilizing both exercises together has not been evaluated in the adolescent population.

CENTRAL HYPOTHESIS: Participants in the rehabilitation groups will have improved static balance, functional performance, and self-reported levels of function at the end of the program compared to the control group.

SPECIFIC AIM 1: To determine which type of rehabilitation program is most effective for improving measures of static balance and functional performance in adolescent patients with Chronic Ankle Instability (CAl).

SPECIFIC AIM 2: To determine which type of rehabilitation program is most effective for improving self-reported levels of function in adolescent patients with CAl as assessed by four clinical questionnaires.

RESEARCH DESIGN: Randomized control trial

METHODOLOGY: 40 patients (15·18 years), three static balance tests, three functional performance tests and four sell-reported patient questionnaires evaluating the effects of three different 4-week rehabilitation programs.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Thirteen 2×4 mixed ANOVAs (a priori as0.05), Tukey’s post-hoc for significant interactions.

EXPECTED OUTCOMES: The rehabilitation groups will have better static balance, functional performance measures, and patient reported outcomes compared to the control group. The combination rehabilitation group will have better static balance and functional performance measures and patient reported outcomes compared to the resistance band only or the BAPS board only rehabilitation groups.

Jul
21
Thu
2016
Prospectus Presentation – Thomas Murphy @ CEHD, Room 1030
Jul 21 @ 11:30 am – 1:30 pm

“Enhancing the Seeking Safety Protocol with Trauma Informed Yoga Practice: A Program Evaluation”

by:  Thomas Murphy

Seeking Safety is an evidenced-based group counseling protocol designed to address the intersection of trauma and addiction. This qualitative program evaluation, using a single-case research design, will analyze the effectiveness of enhancing Seeking Safety with a trauma-informed yoga practice integrated into the Seeking Safety protocol. The author will utilize archival interviews and documents collected from a community mental health agency. Data will include client interviews, key informant interviews, client documents, and demographics. Data will be analyzed using narrative analysis of transcripts and documents to assess the efficacy of Seeking Safety with the yoga enhanced intervention. Implications and recommendations for continued use of trauma-informed yoga with the Seeking Safety protocol will be discussed.

Sep
7
Wed
2016
Distinguished Speaker Series – Helen Malone @ CEHD room 1030
Sep 7 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Distinguished Speaker Series: Helen Malone, The Ohio State University

Helen Malone, associate professor in The Ohio State University’s College of Education and Human Ecology, will speak to CEHD students, faculty and staff Sept. 7 as part of the Distinguished Speaker Series.

Malone has taught students of all ages who have moderate to intensive disabilities and has been involved in special education teacher education both at the pre- and in-service levels. Her research focuses on teaching individuals with severe to profound disabilities new skills and the assessment and treatment of their challenging behaviors. In 2009, she began work on a U.S. Department of Education Steppingstones to Technology grant that focused on the development of video technology that can be used to teach new skills to students of transition age with severe developmental disabilities who may also have a significant hearing impairment. Malone is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and has worked in public schools, private educational behavioral programs and homes developing behavioral programs.

The Distinguished Speaker Series, formerly known as Research Wednesdays, brings cutting-edge researchers at the state and national levels to the college on the first Wednesday of each month. Presentations are held at 12 noon (unless otherwise noted) in the College of Education and Human Development Forum, room 1030.

For more information, click here.

Oct
5
Wed
2016
Distinguished Speaker Series – Kyle Peck @ CEHD room 1030
Oct 5 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Distinguished Speaker Series: Kyle Peck, Penn State University

Kyle Peck, co-director of the Center for Online Innovation in Learning at Penn State University, will speak to CEHD students, faculty and staff Oct. 5 as part of the Distinguished Speaker Series.

Peck studies and applies innovations in education, and his current interests include learning online, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and digital badges in education. He is director of the DIY STEM program, an emerging national opportunity to enhance learning in science, technology, engineering and math through hands-on projects, online learning opportunities and “digital badges.” He is also co-founder of the innovative Centre Learning Community Charter School and completed two terms on the board of directors of the International Society for Technology in Education. Before arriving at Penn State, he taught middle school for seven years and was involved in corporate training for five years. Peck co-authored two books, more than 40 book chapters and journal articles, and four education-related software programs. He is a popular speaker and has made more than 285 presentations at professional conferences in 12 countries.

The Distinguished Speaker Series, formerly known as Research Wednesdays, brings cutting-edge researchers at the state and national levels to the college on the first Wednesday of each month. Presentations are held at 12 noon (unless otherwise noted) in the College of Education and Human Development Forum, room 1030.

For more information, click here.

Oct
21
Fri
2016
11th Annual Sources of Urban Educational Excellence Conference @ Georgia State University College of Law
Oct 21 – Oct 23 all-day

11th Annual Sources of Urban Educational Excellence Conference
Breaking (The Neutral) Ground: Collaboration, Negotiation and Celebration in Urban Education

Conference Dates: October 21-23, 2016
Pre-Conference Dates: October 17-21, 2016

More information will be added closer to the conference.

Nov
2
Wed
2016
Distinguished Speaker Series – Kent McGuire @ CEHD room 1030
Nov 2 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Distinguished Speaker Series: Kent McGuire, Southern Education Foundation

Kent McGuire, president and CEO of the Southern Education Foundation, will speak to CEHD students, faculty and staff Nov. 2 as part of the Distinguished Speaker Series.

McGuire is responsible for the organization’s mission, which is to advance equity and excellence in education in the American South. Prior to joining SEF, he served as dean of the College of Education at Temple University and was a tenured professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. Previously, McGuire was senior vice president at MDRC, Inc., served as assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Education during the Clinton administration and was the education program officer for the Philadelphia-based Pew Charitable Trusts. He received his Ph.D. in public administration from the University of Colorado at Boulder, his M.A. in education administration and policy from Columbia University Teacher’s College and his B.A. in economics from the University of Michigan.

The Distinguished Speaker Series, formerly known as Research Wednesdays, brings cutting-edge researchers at the state and national levels to the college on the first Wednesday of each month. Presentations are held at 12 noon (unless otherwise noted) in the College of Education and Human Development Forum, room 1030.

For more information, click here.

Feb
1
Wed
2017
Distinguished Speaker Series – Jerome Harste @ CEHD room 1030
Feb 1 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Distinguished Speaker Series: Jerome Harste, Indiana University

Jerome Harste, professor emeritus of literacy, culture and language education at Indiana University, will speak to CEHD students, faculty and staff Feb. 1 as part of the Distinguished Speaker Series.

Harste taught at Indiana University from 1970-2006, becoming the first Armstrong Chair in the School of Education in 1997. He has received numerous awards for his work in early literacy, including the David H. Russell Research Award from the National Council of Teachers of English and the Oscar Causey Research Award for Outstanding Contributions to the profession’s understanding of the reading process. In 1997, he was inducted into the Reading Hall of Fame and in 2008, he was recognized as an outstanding language arts educator by the elementary section of the National Council of Teachers of English. At Indiana University, he received the Gorman Teaching Award from the School of Education and the Frederic Bachman Lieber Memorial Teaching Award from the university. He has served on the Board of the International Reading Association as well as the President of the National Reading Conference (now the Literacy Research Association), the Whole Language Umbrella, the National Conference on Research in Language and Literacy and the National Council of Teachers in English.

The Distinguished Speaker Series, formerly known as Research Wednesdays, brings cutting-edge researchers at the state and national levels to the college on the first Wednesday of each month. Presentations are held at 12 noon (unless otherwise noted) in the College of Education and Human Development Forum, room 1030.

For more information, click here.